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Thread: Deadlands -The Colt-

  1. #11
    Forum Fifty Club Bryan Stewart is on a distinguished road Bryan Stewart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tssmith2002 View Post
    There are a couple of points to consider for your "Colt" campaign. Why would you use a Patterson anyway? The original model (1832-1838) were somewhat fragile and time consuming to load without loading gates. The Second Model was better off since it included a load gate as well as a loading lever but still not a firearm that I would chose for a "Haunt" killer. By 1877, many more and much better firearms existed and would be a better choice for the "one beastie, one bullet" sidearm.

    Astronomical events aren't that hard to come by. This is just one link that I had handy, plenty more where that came from. http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/lin.../timeline.html There was a triple conjunction in 1877, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triple_conjunction Mars was in opposition in 1877 http://www.uapress.arizona.edu/onlin...ars/chap05.htm

    Making firearms takes many items and techniques to perfect... I didn't see you mention case-hardening which gives that beautiful mottled finish or a traditional bluing which would definitely take all kinds of materials and processes to get right...

    Just some thoughts
    Todd Smith
    Thank you very much, Im not wise in the ways of gunsmithing so I hope you dont mind if i tap your brain for more information. What processes are used in finishing a gun?

    ANd I'll admit it i was a bit of a dummy I searched for astrological events instead of Astronomical so I got alot of astrology websites that didn't help me at all thank you again this was what I was looking for.

  2. #12

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    Todd, good to hear from you. Hope all is well with you, Ann, and Bradley!
    Trav O
    Operations Director of CharCon

  3. #13

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    Isn't quitting work and becoming a full time GM, Dave's strategy and how well did that work him?


  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Davis View Post
    Todd,
    ...or Church, God is everywhere, right?
    Glad to at least see you on the forums.
    I was on the forums originally but somehow my account aged out or was deleted or something. I normally watch the forums by RSS feeds since that works better for me

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Orders View Post
    Todd, good to hear from you. Hope all is well with you, Ann, and Bradley!
    Thanks, and how is your family? Have you had to go back to Virginia anytime recently?

    Todd

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Stewart View Post
    Thank you very much, Im not wise in the ways of gunsmithing so I hope you dont mind if i tap your brain for more information. What processes are used in finishing a gun?

    ANd I'll admit it i was a bit of a dummy I searched for astrological events instead of Astronomical so I got alot of astrology websites that didn't help me at all thank you again this was what I was looking for.
    No problem, I am glad to be helpful to you. Finishing a firearm can be as time-consuming and as much work as forging the pieces. Firearms in the 19th Century were generally forged oversized and then machined down to the correct tolerances. It wouldn't be until much later that pieces would be cast in a mold. Iron frames were frequently used to save cost and steel was only used for cylinders and sometimes strikers.

    The actual finish depends on what you want it to look like. Case-hardening was used on Colt barrels and frames as well as a chemical "bluing" Case-hardening is heating the frame and other parts like triggers to around 1400 degrees F to temper the metal. This also creates a beautiful mottled finish. The auction pictures at Gunbroker do a good job of showing what a brand-new case-hardened finish would look like. http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=142311377

    Bluing is a chemical process that prevents rust by bonding to the metal. It has to be cleaned and oiled regularly to keep it from rusting but it is better then leaving the metal "white" or unfinished. Lye, and Potassium Nitrate and boiling water are traditionally used to blue firearms but like many things, as many recipes as people. Some good bluing pictures are at http://www.armchairgunshow.com/otsHC_Colt_revolvers.htm and some other good pictures at http://www.ocyoung.com/Colts.htm

    Nickel or Chrome finish is also possible even though Hard Chrome wasn't easily worked in this time period. It just depends on what you want your firearm to look like.

    Of course, glyphs, runes, hexes and other engraving takes time and possible special materials, like feather quill from a vulture dipped in rattlesnake venom under the dark of the Moon. The grips don't have to be wood, bone like staghorn was very common as well as ivory or mother of pearl. The history of firearms as well as many books and games that make magic items should give you as much material as you could ever wish for.

    Todd

  7. #17
    Forum Fifty Club Bryan Stewart is on a distinguished road Bryan Stewart's Avatar
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    Thanks again todd, very informative.

    My google-fu is weak, how many parts are in a average 1800's gun, barrel, cylinder, grips, trigger, trigger guard, and hammer??

    as for the grips i think i will use the horn of a gnoph-keh (a 6 legged horned polar bear from call of cthulhu) .

    the gun itself will be a mix of metals steal, silver and star metal (metal from a fallen star that is being worshiped by an indian tribe)

    the group will do some escort missions for easy-ish runs, collecting rare items durring the different moon phases and so on i have a few weeks to work on it and im still asking questions so its all good.

    Thanks again Todd

  8. #18

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    If this is a Deadlands game than Ghost Rock should be present in the forging of any cool item. Maybe It was used in the forge for heat. Maybe it was smelted into the iron for the barrel or some other part. Anyway, gotta use the Rock.

    TR
    Director of Stuff

  9. #19
    Forum Fifty Club Bryan Stewart is on a distinguished road Bryan Stewart's Avatar
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    Oh of course it ges without saying ghostrock is playing a part

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Stewart View Post
    Thanks again todd, very informative.

    My google-fu is weak, how many parts are in a average 1800's gun, barrel, cylinder, grips, trigger, trigger guard, and hammer??

    as for the grips i think i will use the horn of a gnoph-keh (a 6 legged horned polar bear from call of cthulhu) .

    the gun itself will be a mix of metals steal, silver and star metal (metal from a fallen star that is being worshiped by an indian tribe)

    the group will do some escort missions for easy-ish runs, collecting rare items durring the different moon phases and so on i have a few weeks to work on it and im still asking questions so its all good.

    Thanks again Todd
    I am sorry that it has taken me so long to get back to you but it has been a busy weekend.

    How many parts to a typical period firearm? More then you would think and more then you want to use. The Numrich Gun Parts Corporation is one of the world's leading suppliers of gun parts and has been in business nearly an hundred years has schematics for many firearms that they might have parts for. The Colt 1877 Lightning Double-Action Revolver lists 51 parts... It is a nice firearm and possibly one to choose as your base weapon but still 51 is a lot of parts to find.

    http://www.e-gunparts.com/products_new.asp?CatID=7369

    Typically, though you have frame, mainspring, cylinder, hammer, which can be the firing pin, trigger, trigger guard, barrel, sight, grips, custom engraving, rough finish, final finish and plenty of screws and pins to hold it all to together.

    Todd

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